Saskatoon’s beautiful rolling hills and flat prairie lands divided by the South Saskatchewan River was once home to the First Nations up until the 1880’s when European settlement of Saskatoon began. This charming city retains its reputation as “Paris of the Prairies” with its multiple bridges that pass over the winding South Saskatchewan River. Home to 257,000 people, Saskatchewan’s largest city offers incredible walking trails, a multitude of water sports to be done on the river, cozy and historic accommodations, great food and drink, and more.



Running along both sides of the South Saskatchewan River, the beautiful Meewasin Trail takes you under the bridges and through conservation areas and parks. You will be treated to a beautiful view of the river throughout most of the trail. This trail was voted #1 place Saskatonians like to go for a walk and it is easy to see why. The trail has multiple access points along the 20km stretch with washroom facilities throughout, so it is a great option for all lengths of walks. Popular activities along the trail include cycling, jogging and walking in the warmer months, and cross-country skiing and skating in Kiwanis Memorial Park in the winter.



The Weir was built in 1940 and is located on the South Saskatchewan River – You can access this area either by car or by bike or by foot using the Meewasin Valley Trail.  The Weir is one of the most visited destinations in Saskatoon for its incredible view of the river, the CPR Bridge and white pelicans near the water during the warmer months.



The CPR Bridge is one of the best views in Saskatoon with views of the University of Saskatchewan, South Saskachewan River, Sandbar Island and some of the prairies off into the distance.  The bridge is accessible from the Weir parking lot.  There is a large set of metal stairs leading up to the top of the bridge where there is a platform and pedestrian crossing.  This bridge was constructed by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1908 with the pedestrian walkway being added in 1909.  The bridge is 341 metres (1120 feet long) with a rail line that serves as a connector between Winnipeg and Edmonton.  If you happen to be in luck and on the bridge while a train passes you are in for quite the experience!


This beautiful university campus has so much history and character, so it is worth a visit during your time in Saskatoon.  Some of the buildings date back to 1905 and have the charming Elizabethean shape in Collegiate Gothic style build to them.   The Peter MacKinnon Building is a national historic site and the centerpiece to the campus.  With an old world feel on the outside and a modern twist on the inside, visitors to the campus will be pleasantly surprised.



These incredible tasty and nutritious berries – also known as Saskatoon Berries – are a must have while visiting Saskatoon.  Saskatoon Berries have been a staple in peoples diets for hundreds of years.   The berries have a multitude of uses including being made into pies, tarts, scones, muffins, bread, sauces, wine, cider, tea and more.  You can find Saskatoon berries all throughout the town including farmers markets and grocery stores.


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